Legend of Sheba Intro

Did you hear?! Tosca Lee has a new book out today! Click here to watch a trailer and then come back here to read a Q&A provided by the author and her crew.

The Legend of Sheba by Tosca Lee is published by Howard Books.

The Legend of Sheba by Tosca Lee is published by Howard Books, an imprint of Simon and Schuster.

The Legend of Sheba comes out TODAY (9/9/14) and is available from the following retailers or wherever books are sold:
Simon & Schuster
Amazon
ChristianBook.com

  • You are known for your meticulous research. How did researching Legend of Sheba differ from your other books?

After a year and a half of hard research for Iscariot, I thought research for Sheba would be much easier. Not so! It is much harder to fill in the historical record of 1000 years earlier than the time of Christ due to the dearth of archaeological progress in history-rich and troubled Yemen, natural phenomena such as the encroaching sands of the desert, and a lack of historical records recording any queen in the Southern Arabian region.

  • What do we actually know about the Queen of Sheba?

We know something about the Sabaean (the Israelite Sheba = ancient Arabian Saba) people: that they had a capital in Marib, a sovereign “federator” who united the kingdoms of Saba, an elegant and evolving script, a sophisticated dam near the capital that turned Marib’s dusty fields into oases, and that there is great evidence of Sabaean settlement in the area of Ethiopia near what would become Aksum. We know the Sabaeans of the 10th Century BC worshipped the moon god, Almaqah, though experts do not agree whether this was a male or female deity. We know that in terms of the ancient world, they were quite rich due in large part to their cultivation of frankincense in the southeastern region, and that they had an extensive and evolving trade network that extended as far north as Damascus, as far east as India, and as far west across the Red Sea as Ethiopia and the continent beyond.

  • The queen is a very minor character in the scope of the biblical narrative, but you assert that her famous visit to King Solomon is vitally important in the scope of Old Testament history. Why?

For two reasons. If the story of the United Monarchy (the kingdom of David and his son/successor, Solomon) is not true, then the bedrock of three major world religions (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam) collapses into fiction, and the claim of Jews to the land of Israel with it. Perhaps the authors of 1 Kings and 2 Chronicles knew that, because they took the opportunity to basically say, “Hey, this queen from the ends of the earth, that famous Queen of Sheba, came and brought tribute to our king, and blessed him and our god and said ‘All that I heard was true, and I never even heard the half of it!’” This is fascinating. It begs the question: what was it that was so great about this female sovereign—in a time when the world was ruled by men—and a pagan, no less… what was it about her that was so outstanding that her endorsement of Solomon, his riches, wisdom, and god, held so much weight as to be included in the Old Testament narrative? Who was this woman who matched wits with the wisest man in the world—whose throne was so secure that she could leave it and make the 1400 mile journey of half a year to visit this king… before making the long trek back? Well, this must be a woman worth knowing something about.

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To find Tosca Lee online you can hop over to any of these sites:

Website: http://www.toscalee.com/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AuthorToscaLee
Twitter: https://twitter.com/ToscaLee
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/427839.Tosca_Lee
Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/toscalee/
Instagram: http://instagram.com/toscalee

Upcoming this later this week: More Q&A with Tosca Lee and most importantly a review of The Legend of Sheba!

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