American Patriots – Rick Santorum

Summary: American Patriots: Answering the Call to Freedom is a compilation of 25 accounts of Revolutionary War men and women. The Declaration of Independence shares the beliefs on which the country was founded, “. . .that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights. . .”, and the men and women whose stories are told here fought for those beliefs. Rick Santorum presents a well-researched history of some of the important people of the Revolution. Some of the name are more well-known than others, but all of them were brave souls willing to stand up for their beliefs.

Review: I learned a lot of things about the American Revolution that I didn’t know before. Most of the people Rick Santorum included in the book were people that I had heard very little, if anything, about. It was quite refreshing to read something new about history for once. At the end, I was left with the question in my mind of “Would I do the same?”. I’d like to think that I would.

The book itself is divided up into three parts, one for each of the “unalienable Rights” given in the Declaration of Independence. Part One is comprised of five chapters and tells the stories of seven individuals who did their part for the “unalienable Right” to Life. I think I was most intrigued by this section, especially the story of Peter Francisco. George Washington, the future President, spoke very highly of him and I thought it quite interesting that I’d never heard much of anything about him. Apparently March 15 is Peter Francisco Day in three states, which makes me wonder why we don’t give him more attention. Part Two is also five chapters and has 12 mini-biographies focusing on those who stood up for Liberty. A couple of the people in this section are Abraham Whipple and Phillis Wheatley. Part Three, again, is five chapters  with six individuals who fought for The Pursuit of Happiness. The appendix includes the text of the Declaration of Independence and a list of the signers.

Did I like the book? Yes I did. It was easy to read and it wasn’t about the “usual” people you hear about in regards to the Revolutionary War.  I plan on using this book as supplementary history reading when my children are in junior high or high school. It’s a very good starting point for learning about some of the other important people of that era.

Disclaimer: I received this book for free from Tyndale in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts are my own.

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